Greece with a Baby or Toddler

Mosquitoes can be an annoying problem, though there is no danger of contracting malaria.

Insect Protection

The electric mosquito-repellent devices are usually sufficient to keep the insects at bay at night and remember to bring a mosquito net for your stroller for when you are out and about in the evenings. Choose accommodation that has fly screen on the windows wherever possible. Some mosquitoes in northern Greece can provoke a severe reaction. For more on insect protection, click here.

Pharmacies & Doctors

Pharmacies are the best for minor ailments. They’re usually open between 8.30am and lunchtime. The pharmacists usually speak English, are knowledgeable and can supply a wide range of medicines and first-aid supplies. Paracetamol and Ibuprofen based products for babies and toddlers are available over the counter. There is at least one doctor on every island and larger islands have hospitals. Pharmacists and staff at your hotel will be able to direct you to a doctor or hospital locally if required. Make sure you bring a first aid kit with you on holiday also to deal with minor ailments along with a thermometer.

In an Emergency

In the event of an emergency, you can call 112 and ask to be connected to an English-speaking operator. If you are the victim of theft or a serious medical emergency contact your local embassy or consulate.

Insurance

Make sure you have medical cover when travelling to Greece. British and Irish travellers are entitled to free or reduced cost emergency healthcare in Greece (apply for a EHIC before you go). However despite the fact that medical training is of a high standard in Greece, bear in mind that the public health service is badly underfunded and hospitals can be overcrowded. Hygiene is not always what it should be and relatives are expected to bring in food for patients. Conditions and treatment are much better in private hospitals, which are expensive. All this means that a good health-insurance policy is essential, particularly when travelling with younger children.



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